Swimming Recap – Day 6

In case you’ve been living under a rock, Team USA dominated YET AGAIN yesterday in the pool!  Apologies for the delayed update, but hey, even bloggers need a day to themselves. Here’s a recap of how the Americans performed on Day 6.

Men’s 200m Individual Medley Final

Advantage: Michael Phelps in the final head-to-head battle between the greatest Olympian of all-time and his anointed successor, Ryan Lochte. Phelps had allowed Lochte to take and maintain the lead in their semifinal heat on the breaststroke, but there would be none of that Thursday as Phelps lead from start to finish, clinching his third consecutive Olympic gold medal in the Men’s 200m Individual Medley.

The race begins with the butterfly, Phelps’ best stroke, before transitioning into a 50m backstroke, which is Lochte’s best stroke. The final two lengths of the pool are breaststroke followed by freestyle. Phelps led Lochte by 0.63 seconds at the finish. Brazil’s Thiago Pereira overtook Lochte on the backstroke for second place and held that slot before giving the silver back to Lochte on the final length of the pool. Hungary’s Laszlo Cseh, always a force in the pool, wavered in the standings the entire race before clinching the bronze a half-second ahead of Pereira.

The final race of Phelps’ career will be the Men’s 4 x 100m Medley Relay Final on Saturday if the Americans qualify from the semifinals.

Men’s 200m Backstroke Final

Does Lochte have a firm grip on future American glory in the pool? Don’t tell that to Tyler Clary, who set an Olympic record time of 1:53.41 in the Men’s 200m Backstroke Final, clinching gold ahead of Japan’s Ryosuke Irie. Clary gained ground on each length of the pool, from the fourth position at the 50m touch, third at the 100m and second at the 150m. Lochte led Clary and Irie all the way through the 150m touch at the wall, but was a half-second behind Clary for the bronze.

Women’s 200m Breaststroke Final

It was a thrilling, global record-setting Women’s 200m Breaststroke Final. First, finishing third for the bronze medal, Russia’s Iuliia Efimova set a European record time of 2:20.92. Finishing second was Japan’s Satomi Suzuki, who equaled the standing Asian record with a time of 2:20.72. But the story for the second-straight day was USA’s Rebecca Soni, who set an American, Olympic and new World Record with a time of 2:19.59, nearly a half-second better than the world record she set in the previous night’s semifinals. Soni added the medal to her silver from the 100m Breaststroke.

Women’s 100m Freestyle Final

American Jessica Hardy was in position for bronze in the Women’s 100m Freestyle at the 50m turn, but she faltered to finish last in the field. Missy Franklin is apparently human after all, though she recovered from last at the turn to finish fifth. Dutch swimmer Ranomi Kromowidjo won gold with an Olympic Record time, Belarus’  Aliaksandra Herasimenia won silver and China’s Tang Yi won bronze.

Men’s 50m Freestyle Semifinals

American swimmers Cullen Jones and Anthony Ervin both qualified for the Men’s 50m Freestyle Final, which will air tonight on NBC in prime time.

Men’s 100m Butterfly Semifinals

Phelps and Tyler McGill qualified first and third for the Men’s 100m Butterfly Final, also to air this evening.

Women’s 200m Backstroke Semifinals

Franklin looks to continue her incredible run at the London Games tonight in the Women’s 200m Backstroke Final, along with teammate Elizabeth Beisel. The pair posted the top two qualifying times.

Women’s 800m Freestyle Qualification

Team USA’s Katie Ledecky led every lap of her qualifying heat and posted the third-best time in the Women’s 800m Freestyle prelims. She’ll swim for the gold medal today.

“Yo Adrian! You Did It!” Team USA Wins Golds, Breaks World Record In Pool

If he had been subjected to the same nailbiting experience as those who watched his race, Nathan Adrian may be wearing a silver medal tonight instead of his gold.

Adrian won his second gold medal of the London Olympics by a fingernail as Americans won the Men’s 100m Freestyle and Women’s 4 x 200m Freestyle Relay finals Wednesday, with Rebecca Soni also claiming the world record in the Women’s 200m Breaststroke in her semifinal swim. Spectators also saw a lane-to-lane duel between American superstars Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte in the Men’s 200m Individual Medley semis.

Men’s 100m Freestyle Final

Adrian, a Bremerton, Wash., native nicknamed “Bok Choi,” won the 100m Free by a mere one one-hundredth of a second with a 47.52 time, overtaking Brazil’s Cesar Celo and Canada’s Brent Hayden after the 50m turn while fending off the rest of the field down the last length of the pool. He tapped the wall just ahead of Australia’s James “The Missile” Magnussen, who himself came back from fifth at the turn. Hayden settled for bronze.

Women’s 4 x 200m Freestyle Relay

Team USA fielded a stacked lineup in the Women’s 4 x 200m Freestyle Relay final, featuring three swimmers who have already won gold medals at these Games.

It was Allison Schmitt to the rescue on the anchor leg, chasing down the Aussies to give the Americans the gold in Olympic record-fashion with a 7:42.92 time. Australia led from the end of the second leg through the third leg. Missy Franklin led off and won the first split, but handed a third place time off to Dana Vollmer. Vollmer retook the lead on her first lap but finished her leg with Team USA in second. Shannon Vreeland, competing in her first Olympics, preserved the Americans’ second-place standing on the third leg before giving way to Schmitt, who posted the Americans’ fastest split times, catching and fending off Australia’s Alicia Coutts to clinched the gold. Schmitt’s relay split was the second-fastest in history.

Men’s 200m Breaststroke Final

Hungary’s Daniel Gyurta took no chances on his way to a gold medal, setting the men’s 200m breaststroke world record with a time of 2:07.28.  Brit Michael Jamieson wowed the home crowd by claiming silver, finishing only .15 seconds behind Gyurta. Japan’s Ryo Tateishi took bronze.

American swimmers Scott Weltz and Clark Burckle never contended for a medal, finishing

Women’s 200m Butterfly Final

The Chinese women’s swim team has been as much of a story as Team USA in London, and it continued its winning ways Wednesday as Jiao Liuyang set an Olympic record and won the gold medal by 1.19 seconds ahead of silver medalist Mireia Belmonte Garcia of Spain. Japan’s Natsumi Hoshi won bronze.

American swimmers were not a threat to medal until the last 50 meters, when Kathleen Hersey made a run after Hoshi. She finished fourth, .3 seconds off the podium. Cammile Adams was at the back of the field for most of the race but rallied to finish fifth.

Women’s 200m Breaststroke Semifinals

Even though her race was just a semifinal, Soni left it all in the pool, setting a world record time of 2:20.00 and leading many to wonder what she would do for an encore in the final, to be swum tomorrow at 1:40 p.m. CT. Soni finished more than two seconds ahead of the next-fastest time by Danish swimmer Rikke Pedersen. American Micah Lawrence, making her London debut, also qualified for the final in the sixth position.

Women’s 100m Freestyle Semifinals

Franklin looks to continue her amazing performance at the games by medaling in tomorrow’s 100m Freestyle final, scheduled for 2:37 p.m. CT. Franklin qualified third out of the semis, with American Jessica Hardy joining her out of the last qualifying spot.

Men’s 200m Individual Medley Semifinals

As potentially his greatest competition for the 200m individual medley, Phelps kept his eyes on Lochte the entire semifinals – literally. Lochte and Phelps swam in adjacent lanes in the first semifinal heat, with Phelps maintaining the lead through both the butterfly and backstroke legs. Lochte took the lead on the breaststroke, and Phelps elected to coast to the wall in the freestyle instead of giving chase, qualifying third. Lochte posted the top qualifying time, while Hungary’s Lasclo Cseh beat out Phelps for the second spot.

Men’s 200m Backstroke Semifinals

Lochte may be the brand name in the backstroke, but Tyler Clary’s stock is also rising. The American outswam his more famous teammate by more than half a second in taking the top qualifying spot in tomorrow’s 200m backstroke final, set for 1:48 p.m. Lochte qualified in the second position.